Archive for the ‘Random’ Category

31 Shopworn Catch Phrases to Avoid Like the Plague

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2015

What would business communication be without catch phrases? (Other than clearer and more authentic.) Those bits of business wisdom or profound insights captured in clever metaphors are indispensable to the corporate world. Who doesn’t want to take an idea offline and bounce it off the wall to see what sticks, every now and then?

Business buzzwords to avoid

Image credit: AMP Agency

The problem of course is that over time, such phrases go from popular to common to annoying—much like an over-played pop song (anybody want to whoop it Gangnam style just one more time? Call me maybe).

Travis Bradberry recently compiled a list of 25 ridiculously overused phrases on Inc. Inspired by that, here are 31 more cliches to shun (the first 10 from a subsequent Twitter conversation).

To avoid sounding like a character out of Office Space (yeah, that would be great), try to stay away from these long-in-the-tooth, over the hill, Elvis (has left the building) expressions.


Business catch phrases to avoid

Some catch phrases come from the sports world. It would be better if these were all left on the field.

11. Slam dunk (as in an obviously great idea or foregone conclusion)

12. Skate to where the puck will be

13. You miss all the shots you don’t take

Some (many actually) come from the movies. Thankfully, almost no one says “make my day” or “surely you aren’t serious” (yes I am—and stop calling me Shirley) any more, but some of these moldy quotes refuse to disappear.

14. Carpe diem

15. You can’t handle the truth

16. Life is like a box of chocolates

17. These aren’t the droids you’re looking for (using any other word in place of “droids”)

And some come from the world of advertising. After 31 years, people have (generally) stopped asking where the beef is, but one still occasionally hears an updated product described as “not your father’s (fill in the blank).” (That’s #18.) Ugh.

Change is the only constant (19), so there are catch phrases describing different degrees of it:

20. Move the needle (a small but significant change)

21. Game changer (an idea with a larger impact)

22. Paradigm shift (a really big change)

Famous quotes often become catch phrases. Please don’t be the one billionth person to trot out Einstein’s definition of insanity (23) or what Henry Ford said about faster horses (24).

And some come from…elsewhere. News events, misplaced metaphors, late nights at the bar, etc..

25. Make the pie bigger

26. Place at the table

27. Preaching to the choir

28. Drinking the Kool-Aid

29. Put on your big boy (or girl) pants

30. Open the kimono (please, no, this one hits a trifecta: overused, creepy, and vaguely racist)

Finally—catch phrases don’t have to be old to be annoying. They can reach eye-rolling, wince-inducing, fingernails-on-chalkboard status quickly through overuse, misuse and abuse. Case in point:

31. Growth hacking

What catch phrases would you advise others to avoid?


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Merry Christmas from Webbiquity!

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2014

Thank for reading the Webbiquity blog this year. Merry Christmas, and best wishes for a happy, healthy, and prosperous 2015.

Marry Christmas from Webbiquity

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Thanks (Twitter) Giving (A Great List to Follow)

Tuesday, November 25th, 2014

As Thanksgiving approaches, I’m grateful for the people in my life: a wonderful family, great friends, phenomenal clients.

I’m also very thankful for the brilliant, insightful, and engaging people I’ve “met” online, and for the social media technologies that make that possible.

Lifelong learning has always been vital for career success, but social media has simultaneously made it easier and much broader. In the pre-Internet days, professionals kept their knowledge and skills up to date by attending conferences, reading books, and subscribing to trade magazines.

Many still use those same resources, but also broaden their perspective and specific expertise through social media. The problem with relying on “paid” media is that the costs of print publishing and events necessarily limit the number of “voices” that can be heard to the most popular.

Though such voices still command large audiences, blogging and social networks have greatly increased the number of voices that can be heard. Smart people with interesting perspectives who may, for a variety of reasons, not have been published in traditional media can attract modestly sized but specialized and highly engaged audiences online. Professionals have a much wider and richer range of sources to turn to for ongoing learning.

I’m grateful this year in particular for the expanding list of marketing and PR professionals who really stand out in terms of producing and sharing valuable content and being socially engaging. Here’s a partial visual snapshot; you can find and subscribe to the full list here. Check out these experts; you may find yourself thankful for them well before this time next year.

An awesome list of marketing and PR pros on Twitter

Happy Thanksgiving!

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Funny Business: The Best Digital Marketing Humor, 2014 Edition

Tuesday, November 11th, 2014

What are you laughing at?

If the answer is “nothing,” then you need to read this post!

Humor can be a highly effective element in marketing campaigns, whether the goal is get people laughing at our competitors, at themselves, or even at us.

Kick back, relax for a few minutes, and check out these 24 examples of some of the best marketing and business humor of the past year or so.

The Most Epic Safety Video Ever Made by Air New Zealand

Air New Zealand celebrates it’s tie in with the popular Hobbit Trilogy movie franchise by creating quite possibly the best airplane safety video ever (though Southwest Airlines does a pretty awesome job with this as well).

Dirt Devil-The Exorcist

A very clever twist on a horror classic.

3 PPC Fails That Can Hurt Your Brand by ClickZ

Michelle Morehouse provides serious advice on pitfalls to avoid in PPC advertising, but uses unusually entertaining examples to illustrate her points, including “The World’s Worst Website” and this:

New WGN Morning News ‘promo:’ Nobody f#@king likes you by WGN TV

First, THIS is how to handle complaint trolls, and second, it’s also how to make weekday morning news shows actually seem interesting.

What This Guy Has Done With These Photos Is Totally Brilliant by ViralSpell

While PhotoShopping is nothing new, this guy’s work really is amazing. Check out this eight-image collection.

PhotoShop genius

Parallel Consumerverse: If Retailers Were Like Google | The Checkout

Inappropriate search suggestion autocomplete, irrelevant search results, creepy re-marketing ads…this video brilliantly nails it all.

The 18 Most Hilarious And Clever Print Ads Ever by Business Insider

Okay, perhaps not most hilarious and clever ever, but certainly amusing and worth wasting a few minutes with.

Ronald M. visits Burger King

12 Smart Jokes That Make You Sound Like a Genius by Reader’s Digest

Andy Simmons presents a dozen jokes that will make people think. Or at least make them think you’re a nerd. Sample: Did you hear about the Buddhist who refused Novocaine during a root canal? His goal: transcend dental medication.

Strategic Humor: Cartoons from the March 2014 Issue by Harvard Business Review

Josh Olejarz showcases cartoon caption winners from HBR.

HBR cartoon - retirement plan

Strategic Humor: Cartoons from the November 2014 Issue by Harvard Business Review

If you enjoyed the cartoons above, check out this updated collection.

HBR cartoon - math answer

25 hilariously unexplainable images by Just something (creative)

Just a collection of images that, as the title of the post implies, defy explanation. Really.

Impossible to explain

17 Cartoons that Will Change Your Business by Brian Solis

What authemticity isBrian Solis shares a collection of cartoons created by Hugh MacLeod for Brian’s book, What’s the Future of Business. This post highlights the first cartoon, all of which are compiled in a Slideshare presentation.

The Hundred Best Lists of All Time by The New Yorker

Not all of the lists on this list of lists compiled by Gary Belsky are funny per se, but the list is quite extraordinary. Some of the lists are actually useful (e.g., U.S. News and World Report’s best-college rankings and “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People”) while others are…just interesting (such as The World Rock Paper Scissors player’s responsibility code and the 1927 Yankees’ opening-day lineup).

Dracula’s LinkedIn Profile by Social Media Today

This is actually a serious post from Celina Guerrero on how to optimize your LinkedIn profile, but it creatively uses Count Dracula’s LinkedIn account as an example.

Dracula's LinkedIn profile

20 Funny Tweets Your Brand Should Take Seriously by Mashable

Max Knoblauch shares a collection of brand tweets that are funny, creative, or in some cases, just plain odd. But they seemed to resonate with Twitterers.

SEGA tweet

“#Hashtag” with Jimmy Fallon & Justin Timberlake (Late Night with Jimmy Fallon)

On the off-chance you haven’t already seen this – Jimmy Fallon and JT spoof hashtags, showing “what a Twitter conversation sounds like in real life.”

10 hilarious digital media parodies by iMedia Connection

From “Catvertising” to “Are Chairs Like Facebook” to “I Have Timeline” to “”CIA’s ‘Facebook’ Program Dramatically Cuts Agency’s Costs,” here are 10 of the best spoofs and satires of digital marketing and media. Some are a bit dated, but still funny.

9 of the craziest PR and social media requests by Ragan’s PR Daily

Writing “With the assistance of Help A Reporter Out (HARO), I wanted to document some of the craziest, most absurd requests or assignments PR and social media professionals have received,” Ryan Greives has compiled quite a list here, with such gems as ““Please have Matt Lauer read this exact script” and “Get Queen Noor and NASA on the phone.” Enough to make PR pros laugh (or maybe cry).

Digital Marketing Buzzword Bingo by Digital Growth

For some interactive fun, Luke Chapman offers a downloadable digital marketing buzzword (Key Influencers, Halo Effect, Content is King, etc.) bingo card to print and bring along to your next marketing meeting or seminar. “Cross out a square each time you hear the buzzword. When you have an entire row crossed out, stand up and shout ‘BINGO!'” Something you probably don’t want to try when your boss is speaking.

THIS JUST IN: Harvard professor explains how to perfectly market on mobile by iMedia Connection

Harvard professor of network marketing Ellis Fowler has provided a step-by-step guide to mobile marketing, and reportedly “doesn’t understand why digital marketers find mobile so confusing.” I won’t spoil it, but this is worth a quick look.

5 Funniest Pinterest Parodies by SEO Chat

The wild success of Pinterest has inspired the creation of other photo-sharing platforms, but also some parodies. Here are five rather interesting sites designed to playfully mock the original, including Pinstrosity (which includes categories “like missing directions, misprinted supplies, cleaning tips gone awry, DIY project fails and less than stellar recipes”) and Really Pinterest?, a showcase for some of the oddest shared images, like this one.

Odd images from Pinterest

12 Vertical Social Networking Sites You May Not Know Of by TwittNotes

Sure, LinkedIn is for professionals, Pinterest is for sharing recipes, and Snapchat is for exhibitionists, but this collection of specialty social networks goes way beyond. There’s Ravelry, a network just for “knitters, weavers, spinners, and crocheters”; Catster, a community for cat lovers; and many more.

20 Worst Advertising Placement Fails by Bored Panda

When good creative meets bad placement, the results can be embarrassing for brands, but funny for everyone else. Check out these unfortunate but amusing examples.

Unfortunate ad placement fail

How To Be Funny: Stand-Up Comic Takes Public Speakers to School by DIY Blogger NET

Humor doesn’t come naturally to all of us. Okay, more like not to most of us. Looking for some expert guidance on how to liven up your next presentation? Watch as standup comic Brendan Fitzgibbons gives Dino Dogan practical tips on how to be funny. This video is useful (though not short—about 26 minutes).

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Accomplish More, Stress Less – Five Ways to Be More Productive

Wednesday, October 29th, 2014

If there’s one universal truth in business today, it’s that everyone is busy. This is what drives people to try to multitask (even though it’s not possible). It’s why we’re told that as marketers, we have only 30 seconds (or less) to get a reader’s attention, and why 40% of website visitors will abandon a page that takes more than three seconds to load (four or five seconds – who’s got that kind of time?!).

It’s certainly not the case that five years ago, workers had all the time in the world–that they could stresslessly ponder the ramifications of and reflect upon the results of each task. No, people were already very busy back in 2008-2009; but the great recession magnified this. Many large companies have discovered how much they can get done with how little, and are unlikely to relax demands much even in an improving employment climate.

Here then are five ways to get more done without simply working longer hours.

The Rock-Pebble-Sand-Water Model

The Rock-Pebble-Sand-Water ModelIf you’re not familiar with this model, it involves categorizing tasks as either rocks (large and important projects), pebbles (smaller, but still somewhat important activities), sand (the small stuff, e.g., checking email) and water (everything else). The idea is that if you think of your time as a jar and start by filling it with pebbles and sand, the rocks will never fit it.

But if you put the rocks into your “jar” first, the pebbles, sand and water will fill in the spaces.

This model is popular with management gurus, but can be challenging to implement. The key is to understand that, ultimately, you have to decide which of your tasks are really rocks–and which are pebbles, sand, or even something that just doesn’t belong in your jar at all.

The Eisenhower Decision Matrix

The Eisenhower Decision MatrixIn the Eisenhower Decision Matrix (originally developed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower but later popularized by Stephen Covey), tasks are organized into four boxes, with the degree of urgency on one scale and importance on the other.

Items that are both urgent and important (significant problems or opportunities) represent the largest “rocks” in the model above. Tasks that are important but not necessarily urgent (e.g., getting a blog post written for next week, catching up on project management organization) are smaller rocks. They have to get done, just not necessarily immediately.

Two important considerations when using this model are 1) making clear who decides which tasks are in which box (as it’s likely not everyone will agree on either the urgency or importance of any given task) and 2) properly setting expectations, particularly for those tasks which are important but not urgent.


Combine either or both of the models above with scheduling or day planning.

Once beyond college age, the majority of people are most mentally alert in the early morning hours. To take advantage of this, use the first part of the morning (i.e., from as early as you’re able to start work until about 10:00) to take care of “rocks” or urgent+important tasks, particularly those requiring significant mental effort.

Use the “core” hours of the day (10:00 to 4:00) for tasks involving communication and coordination with others, and late afternoon for tasks requiring time and effort but not strenuous mental exertion.

To help maintain this regimen, minimize checking email during the early morning and late afternoon time slots.

The Pomodoro Technique

The Pomodoro Technique for productivityWhile there’s an entire book devoted to this strategy, to grossly oversimplify, the Pomodoro technique involves working in short 25-minute bursts of concentrated effort, punctuated by five-minute breaks. After four “pomodoros” (Italian for “tomatoes”) have passed, you take a longer (15-20 minute) break.

Writers and others who need to get and stay “in the zone” mentally for a bit longer in order to be optimally productive may opt for what could be called the “big tomato” or “ripe tomato” variation of this strategy: work for 60-90 minute periods, followed by a 10-15 minute break, with a 30-minute break after three such stretches.


The most direct way to get more done is to get more people working. “Many hands make light work,” as your grandmother may have said.

Delegation is not only for those in management roles. Bloggers, for example,  can delegate by inviting guest posters to contribute content or asking experts to answer questions for a round-up post.

Freelancers can be hired, often at nominal cost, to perform specific tasks. And partnering with another individual–and sharing the credit–is a great way to double the end result of a project, or cut the effort required in half.

What productivity hacks do you find most useful?

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