Archive for the ‘Web Analytics’ Category

6 Traits of Highly Effective Data Analysts

Tuesday, November 18th, 2014

Guest post by Robert Murphy, Managing Partner at Movéo.

In today’s world, technology and marketing conditions are dynamic, but clients still demand predictable results, minimized waste and accountability. In order to achieve these goals, marketers must master the ability to collect the right data and then glean insights to drive strategy and measure effectiveness. The smartest marketers not only understand this approach, but are leading the charge to take it mainstream.

What skills does a data analyst need?While the notion seems simple enough, the majority of marketers have not mastered the skills and processes needed to be successful in harnessing the power of data.

During upfront planning, it’s essential for marketers to use the right tools, analyze data, pull out meaningful insights and use that information to craft a strong strategy. On the back end, data allows marketers to measure the success of a campaign or program and optimize future plans based on those results.

This has changed the way we as marketers work. Jiani Zhang, Movéo’s Director Vice President of Data and Insights puts it best:

“We have easier access to more and more data in all kinds of areas to help us make decisions, build better and more engaging customer experiences, dig out insights and uncover opportunities, rather than thinking about everything with a gut feeling and guesswork,” says Zhang. “[Data] and the insights we gather from it helps us make more efficient, more accurate decisions.”

Along with the demand for data comes the demand for talented data analysts—marketing specialists who understand how to interpret 21st-century data and identify insights that will inform their clients’ strategies and ultimately help them achieve their business goals.

So what exactly are agencies and companies looking for in a data analyst? What characteristics do you need to succeed in today’s data-driven marketing world?

1. Creativity

Statistical analysis is only one part of the job. Data analysts need a creative spirit, one that pushes them to experiment, remain flexible and solve problems with a new, fresh perspective.  And though there’s plenty of solo work time, they have to be able to share knowledge and collaborate as a team member. “I spend about a third of my day in front of a white board, with my team brainstorming different ways we can solve a problem,” says Dean Malmgren, a Data Scientist and Partner at Datascope Analytics. “That’s a very collaborative thing.”

2. Curiosity

Top-notch data analysts look for the meaning—the “why”—behind the numbers. With an insatiable drive to discover actionable insights, they constantly ask questions and search for solutions. Curiosity fuels them and the possibility of failure doesn’t scare them.

Matt Webster, Executive Vice President of Strategy and Planning at Movéo believes curiosity is the “one crucial character trait” for those working with data. “At the end of the day, what you really want is someone who’s curious, who enjoys drilling into data and spending a lot of time with it, hours on end, and coming up with a big insight that fuels the development of a strategy,” says Webster.

3. A strategic perspective

While data analysts often have to dig deep and get lost in data, those who are most effective also have the ability to think beyond a tactical level. With a “big picture” outlook, they keep both the client’s goals and the end customers in mind. Countless tools and theories exist, but these analysts have the wisdom to know which are most relevant to the current project and how to apply them appropriately.

4. Effective communication skills

Great data analysts understand how to transform meaningful data into digestible insights and how to communicate those insights to a wide range of audiences—everyone from clients to the creative team and the IT department. “Storytelling is a very important skill—to [be able to] translate the numbers, the metrics, into very clear and straightforward, actionable and engaging stories,” says Zhang.

By distilling the data into something simple, something people can believe in, data analysts have the ability to make people care. “People need to trust the results,” says Malmgren. “The only thing that makes a data-driven tool useful is whether or not you trust the [results] it puts in front of you. Developing that trust by making sure [the data is] communicated in an effective way is really important.”

5. Continuous learning

Data analysis goes far beyond number-crunching. New technology, tools and theories require the most talented data analysts to stay up-to-date by attending industry events, reading widely and making connections. These folks are proactive thinkers who thrive off of being challenged, day in and day out. As Zhang says, “Be hungry.”

6. Statistical and technical expertise

Of course, it’s impossible to be a stand-out data analyst without strong technical skills. Data interpretation at this level requires critical analysis without bias or expectation, as well as a deep understanding of tools, formulas and models that comes from hands-on experience.

As marketers continue to explore how to best use data to inform strategy and measure effectiveness, data analysts will play a larger role in proving the value of marketing dollars.

“Marketing has always been seen as an expense to [clients],” says Webster. “The marketing team wants to be viewed [as an investment] and have a seat at the table with the C-suite. If the CMO wants that seat, they have to manage against numbers the same way the CFO is doing it.”

Robert Murphy is a Managing Partner at Movéo.  For 27+ years Movéo has partnered with category leading brands to craft strategies and build tactics that engage audiences and drive business growth.  At Movéo, Murphy manages the Data & Insights group, as well as the Strategy & Planning team. He has been named to BtoB Magazine’s list of “Who’s Who, Key Thought Leaders, Movers & Shakers” and is a member of the Board of Directors for the Japan America Society of Chicago.

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The 5-point plan: how to increase marketing ROI from call conversions

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

Guest post by Luke Rees.

Every marketing executive wants to know when their efforts are getting through to consumers, and the online world is certainly making it easier to do so. Whilst there is still no way to track impressions from offline marketing (human interface programmes just aren’t that advanced yet…), the online world makes it possible to track real time results via impressions and clicks.

Increase ROI from call conversionsBut although online is great for understanding your customer base, it may not be the best platform for converting leads into customers. In fact, a recent study found that two thirds of people get frustrated when they can only interact with a company online. 

65% of businesses still consider the phone their strongest lead source, so how can marketers track when their online efforts are generating phone calls?

Here are five techniques marketers can use to better understand their customers; to streamline their experience with the contact centre; and to ultimately improve ROI.

Click-to-call tracking

Click-to-call tracking allows advertisers to identify and measure calls to their business after an ad click through occurs. Google recently announced they are offering this service free for their AdWords users.

How it works:

  1. a code is placed on the company’s website or mobile site;
  2. this code generates a unique forwarding number for each AdWords click;
  3. when a customer calls from a unique number you can link it back to a specific page on your website, as well as publisher sites within the display network, to see the types of calls that are being generated;
  4. with the help of Google Universal Analytics it is possible to track the keywords (i.e. search phrases) the customer used before clicking on your webpage. Your call centre staff are therefore already clued-in about the specific needs of the customer.

Data from this new free feature allows marketers to understand which keywords and ads are driving the most phone calls from your website, as well as where the most valuable calls are coming from.

Customer acquisition

Google’s call conversion tool allows marketers to optimise each page of their website by seeing the amount of engagement it’s getting, but there are also more sophisticated methods available for tracking where customers are coming from.

Here are two more techniques for tracking customer acquisition:

  1. IP and ISP (Subscriber Trunk Dialing) tracking software allows agents to see the exact geographical location where calls are coming in from;
  2. integrating call tracking with bid management software can allow marketers to see the keywords that lead to the most offline telephone conversions. Having this data means they can fine tune their PPC and SEO campaigns.

Companies who understand the needs of their clients and know how to target them are likely to significantly reduce their cost per lead. For one company who had their data reviewed this was as much as 50% reduction.

Conversion to call

Call tracking companies like ResponseTap provide software which allows marketers to track the entire customer journey, not just the initial call.

With the help of web analytics programmes it is possible to see:

  1. which keywords the customer used before calling;
  2. the publisher which drove the visitor to the website;
  3. the webpages they looked at before, during and after each call.

Integrating call tracking with analytics software like Google Adwords tracking, Adobe SiteCatalyst, or DC Storm can further improve customer understanding and increase the conversion to the right kind of call.

One company wanted to reduce information only calls to make capacity for Sales calls. By reorganising content for existing members and non-members differently they were able to increase the conversion to the right kind of call by 66%.

Conversion to sale

Wouldn’t it be great if your call centre staff new exactly the needs of the customer before they’ve even picked up the phone? These three strategies do just that, which significantly increases your chance of making a sale:

  1. Call screening alerts the agent about the campaign that has motivated their call. A phrase is read out to the agent before or after a call, telling them information like how the caller found your website, and what keyword they typed in;
  2. Dynamic call routing allows companies to route a call depending on to how a visitor have found their website. The call can then be directed to the best team, department or person within the business;
  3. SIP (Session Initiation Protocol) can be integrated into your call centre tactics. SIP is a signalling protocol that makes it possible to implement services like voice-enriched e-commerce, web page click-to-dial, or Instant Messaging depending on the preferences of the individual customer.

Using smarter and more sophisticated routing to get the calls to the right people will result in increased ROI. One of the businesses who had their data reviewed saw an uplift in sales of 15%.

Higher order value

Increasing the average order value (AOV) at the end of the customer journey is the final part of the customer journey which marketers can optimise through clever call tracking.

Two way to ensure customers spend bigger are:

  1. URL callbacks allow you to send data about the caller to an online system at the start or end of the call in real time. By storing this data in a database, you can integrate with other online solutions like web analytics or CRM solutions to better understand the customer experience and needs.
  2. CRM Integration: instead of using your CRM to just be a system that retains customer information based on manual entries, integrating your website and call tracking software brings in valuable customer information directly into your CRM. It also enables complete end-to-end reporting of lead to conversion through the call channel.

One company presented the call handler with the actual landing page the customer arrived at so that they had an immediate understanding about their intent. As a result they believe AOV went up 20%.

Conclusion

By taking each point of the customer’s journey in isolation, businesses will begin to notice real results.

Let’s take a look at the example company numbers for each metric, before and after they integrated four call tracking strategies.

So initially traffic acquisition went up 50%, then conversion to phone call improved by 66%, conversion to sale went up 15% and finally AOV increased by 20%:

Before 

  • 1,000,000 visitors
  • converting at 1% from visit to call
  • converting at 20% from call to sale
  • at an AOV of £1000

= £2,000,000 revenue

After (assuming some fairly typical conversion metrics, and the improvement percentages taken from each of the businesses above)

  • 2,000,000 visitors
  • converting at 1.66% to call
  • converting at 23%
  • at an AOV of £1200

= £9,163,200 revenue

The difference on these metrics is a 458% improvement. By implementing some clever software with a few smart tactics to connect online and offline efforts, it is possible to improve marketing ROI exponentially.

Luke Rees is a digital marketing executive from London who writes extensively about technology and trends in the search market industry. You can contact him on LinkedIn and Google+

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Six Expert Guides to Dealing with Keyword (not provided)

Thursday, January 2nd, 2014

In late 2011, Google began redirecting users who were signed into their Google accounts to the encrypted (https) version of the search engine, beginning the keyword (not provided) era. At the time, Matt Cutts assured everyone that the change would only affect single-digit percentages of all organic search traffic reporting.

Keyword (not provided) stormtrooper

Image credit: DealerFire

The reality was, of course, much different. Marketers, webmasters and SEO professionals quickly saw the share of (not provided) keywords rise to the 20%, 30%, even 40% ranges. Then, on September 23, 2013, Google dropped the hammer, encrypting all search traffic and thus hiding keyword referral data for all of its organic search traffic.

The initial response of digital marketing professionals was…panic. Even Rand Fishkin, while not quit declaring the death of search engine optimization, called keyword (not provided) the first existential threat to SEO.

Google’s move did not, of course, “kill” SEO, but it did force marketers to adopt a broader framework to optimize overall web presence. And it forced SEO and analytics professionals to get more creative in how they analyzed and assessed organic search keyword data. Here are half a dozen of the best guides to measuring organic search phrase results in a keyword (not provided) world.

12 Ways to Measure Content Effectiveness After Google’s “Not Provided” Decision by Content Marketing Institute
***** 5 STARS

Mike MurrayWhile many SEO writers offered tips on how to continue to get organic keyword insights after Google stopped providing referring keyword data last fall, this post is one of the best: Mike Murray steps through a dozen techniques for organic keyword analysis, from opening an AdWords account and using Bing/Yahoo data through tracking search rankings and analyzing organic search landing page data.

Search: Not Provided: What Remains, Keyword Data Options, the Future byh Occam’s Razor
***** 5 STARS

Avinash KaushikIn his typical thoroughly researched, profoundly well thought-out, incredibly detailed, and richly illustrated style, Avinash Kaushik examines the implications of the loss of organic keyword data; helpful metrics that remain available (such as Mutli-Channel Funnels in Google Analytics, organic landing page reports, and paid keyword data); alternatives for keyword data analysis; and possible future solutions (such as “page personality analysis”). It’s a great deal to absorb, but worth reading and bookmarking.

Google Webmaster Tools Search Query Data is Accurate (and Valuable) by Search Engine Watch

Ben GoodsellYes, Google Webmaster Tools (WMT) data has become more valuable in the wake of the universal (not provided) issue, but no, it certainly isn’t perfect. Ben Goodsell does an exemplary job here explaining the value of GMT data for SEO analytics, the limitations of the data, and a “secret” workaround to get a bit more detail out of WMT reports.

(Not Provided) Changes the SEO Landscape by iMedia Connection

Dave MurrowDave Murrow steps back and takes a broad view of the keyword (not provided) issue, speculating on why Google may have made the change and recommending that marketers embrace not just new analytics tactics to deal with the loss of organic keyword data, but also strategic changes to website optimization overall.

Not Provided Keywords – SEO Reporting Without Keyword Data by SEER Interactive

Michelle NoonanMichelle Noonan walks through six techniques to help compensate for the loss of Google organic keyword data, inlcuding both the usual sources—Google WMT data, YaBing visits, keyword rankings—and unique ideas like reporting on referral traffic and looking for “unique markers to track” based on each specific client’s objectives and situation.

Ideas for Keyword (Not Provided) by LunaMetrics

Reid BandremerReid Bandremer lists 15 ideas for dealing with Google’s “keyword not provided” issue—including Google Webmaster Tools data, aksing users, and using paid data sources—but concludes that “There’s simply no magic bullet and no single one-size-fits-all solution to solving 100% keyword (not provided). Instead, what we have currently is a very complicated set of many different methods to uncover little gaps in insights left by (not provided).”

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10 of the Best Web Analytics Guides and Tips of 2013

Monday, December 30th, 2013

As the old b-school maxim goes, “you can’t manage what you can’t measure.” One of the attributes of the web that marketers love most (and occasionally hate most) is its nearly infinite measurability.

Best Web Analytics Guides of 2013Which sources sent the most traffic to your site last month? Which converted at the highest rate? What are the trends over time? Which content seemed to make visitors stick—and which pages drove them away? Which metrics are most important to business executives? To PR professionals? To bloggers?

Find the answers to those questions and many more here in ten of the best posts and articles about web analytics from the past year.

9 downloadable custom Google Analytics reports by iMedia Connection

Rachelle MaisnerRachelle Maisner serves up a “four course meal” of custom GA reports, progressing from acquisition metrics (visits and goal conversions by traffic source) as a first course through behavior metrics, conversion measures, and for dessert, site diagnostics including average page load time, bounce rate, and page views.

Google URL Builder: How to Track Links Shared by Razor Social

Ian ClearyWant to track how many people clicked on key links shared across social media channels, email, news releases,and other distribution points? Writing that “The Google URL builder was developed to support this problem. When you create a link using the URL builder you can tag on additional information to the link that describes what the link is about, where the traffic came from when it lands on your site and much more,” Ian Cleary walks through what the URL builder does, how to use it, what happens when you share the link, and how to analyze the results in Google Analytics.

Know Your Social Traffic With These 3 Google Analytics Powerviews by Search Engine People

Ed BaxterEd Baxter details the social metrics available through Google Analytics and how to use this data to gain a richer perspective of the value and activity of social web traffic. For example, “Knowing which pages visitors look at in a tabular view is helpful but with the Visitor Flow report, we can begin to truly understand where people are landing on our site and how they process through it, highlighting potential trouble areas like never before within Google Analytics.”

How to Filter Bot Traffic From Your Google Analytics by LunaMetrics

Jim GianoglioNoting that “Bot visits skew your data, artificially inflating visits and unique visitors, increasing bounce rate, and decreasing pages/visit, average visit duration, goal conversion rate, ecommerce conversion rate, etc,” Jim Gianoglio shows how to create filters and custom segments within Google Analytics to prevent bot visits from skewing your (real) visitor data.

Analyze and optimize your search footprint with the new paid & organic report by Inside AdWords

Dan Friedman unveils the new Paid & Organic report for AdWords advertisers, explaining that “Previously, most search reports showed paid and organic performance separately, without any insights on user behavior when they overlap. The new paid & organic report is the first to let you see and compare your performance for a query when you have either an ad, an organic listing, or both appearing on the search results page.”

Three Data Points to Measure Your Blog Efforts by Spin Sucks

Gini DietrichThe delightful Gini Dietrich steps through the process of setting up Goals in Google Analytics to track “how engaged the readers are (even if they don’t comment), whether or not they’re big readers, and increases in subscribers” (or any type of conversion action, such as white paper or ebook downloaders for example).

The metrics that will make your CMO love you by iMedia Connection

John EllettWell, competitive multi-channel marketing metrics are what will make your CMO truly love you, but John Ellett makes an excellent case here for three categories of measures: revenue contribution metrics, customer feedback metrics, and marketing effectiveness/efficiency metrics.

Periodic Table of Google Analytics by Jeffalytics
***** 5 STARS

Jeff SauerAs a result of “working on a project to categorize and visually display all of the powerful options available within Google Analytics,” Jeff Sauer came up with this brilliant guide in the form of a periodic table, in both clickable interactive and printable PDF formats. Worth bookmarking.

The public relations pros’ guide to Google Analytics by Polaris B

Shelley PringleWriting that “In today’s converging marketing world it’s especially important for public relations pros to understand the ins and outs of Google, SEO and online analytics. If your mandate is generating media coverage and you understand GA, you’ll be abe to show the benefit of the coverage you’ve secured that goes beyond audience impressions,” Shelley Pringle shares an infographic to guide PR pros to helpful Google Analytics-related resources based on their needs and level of analytics knowledge.

Google Analytics Regular Expressions Cheat Sheet by Cheatography

Get your geek on with this helpful cheat sheet from Jay Taylor, listing Google Analytics regular expressions for character classes, filter group accessors, quantifiers (e.g, zero or more), ranges and groups, and more—along with sample patterns showing how these expressions can be used.

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How To Analyze and Grow Website Visits

Friday, October 4th, 2013
Editor’s note: a version of this post originally appeared on ChamberofCommerce.com

If your responsibilities including managing and optimizing website results for a small to midsized organization, chances are you’re using Google Analytics to track website traffic. Google Analytics is used on more than half of all websites. And if it’s not installed, it should be: the Google Analytics (GA) tool is free, powerful, and easy to set up.

For many small to midsized businesses (SMBs), the biggest problem with GA is that it provides too much information. There are a dozen reports under the “Audience” tab alone (not counting “custom” reports). Every report means something to someone, but which are most important from a small business perspective?The long answer to that question could fill an ebook. The short answer? One of the most actionable reports for SMBs is the All Traffic report. To access it within GA, click on Acquisition > All Traffic in the left sidebar menu, then choose Medium as your Primary Dimension. You should see something like this:

Google Analytics - Sources of Traffic

 

 

Although the figures will vary from site to site, all sites include at least these three Google traffic categories: direct (none), referral and search (organic) visits. Which sources of traffic should you work to increase? All of them!

And although you can adopt a number of strategies to boost your site’s traffic, a proven approach is web presence optimization (WPO): the art and science of being found.

As you study your All Traffic report, it helps to understand each type of web traffic, which also helps you learn more about your audience—and in turn, you can make improvements to your site that better serve visitors, thereby boosting your traffic. Let’s take a look at the three traffic sources and how you can improve them:

Direct (“none”) Traffic

Direct traffic primarily comes from two sources: visitors typing in a site URL directly into their browser, or clicking on a stored bookmark. The first group is likely to contain more prospective customers and others new to your site, while the latter is more often existing customers and partners.

To drive more repeat (bookmarked) direct visits, offer resources, additional products/services, support and other reasons, including regularly updated content, for customers to keep returning to your site.

New direct visits result from both offline and online branding activities. Offline tactics include trade shows and other events, business cards, direct mail, printed brochures, signage and print advertising.

Online branding tactics include media mentions, building links by writing guest posts and articles, product reviews, social media, and industry activities like high-quality directory listings and trade association membership. Note that, as part of an effective WPO strategy, these activities also drive more referral visits and create valuable backlinks that help attract more visits from search.

Referral Traffic

Referral traffic results from visitors clicking links on other websites that lead to your website—think of it as following a trail of digital breadcrumbs directly to your online hub. Possible sources of referral traffic links include:

  • • News articles in trade, local or business publications
  • • Coverage by industry or financial analysts
  • • Product reviews
  • • Blogs (guest posts, comments or blogroll links)
  • • Industry and local business directories
  • • Partner websites (e.g., retailers, resellers, technology partners, affiliates or vendors)
  • • Social media sites (e.g., YouTube, LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, SlideShare, Scoop.it)
  • • Online forums and discussion boards
  • • Trade show and event websites
  • • Other company or product websites or microsites (mostly for large organizations)

In many cases, your company may attract such links over time simply through normal business activities. A more proactive (and effective) approach, however, is to help build links through a combined digital marketing strategy that includes PR, social, content marketing, and SEO. As you use each of these components to build links and boost your visibility, keep a close eye on your referral traffic. What types of sites send the most traffic your way? That data is a clear signal to continue using those sources in order to keep your referral traffic at optimal levels. Additionally, a robust set of WPO metrics can help in evaluating the value of traffic from each referral source as well as identify competitor links and tactics to emulate.

Search (Organic) Traffic

As you can probably guess, search traffic is comprised of visits from Google, Yahoo!, Bing and a host of smaller search engines. To increase search traffic, your site needs to be optimized to rank highly in the search engines for the types of phrases that buyers use when searching for the types of products and/or services you offer.

Rankings are determined by a combination of relevance (how well does the content on your site align with the search query) and authority (the number and quality of backlinks to your website).

Backlinks, as noted above, can be generated through PR, social, SEO, and other marketing tactics. Links are most valuable when they appear on sites that are highly relevant to your business, i.e., other websites that your prospective customers would be likely to visit for information. Links from low-quality, general purpose directories were helpful for ranking at one time, but are now essentially worthless (and can even be harmful to rankings if your site has too many such links).

The best type of content is that which educates your buyers or helps them solve problems, and only indirectly promotes your products or services. After all, your customers don’t necessarily want to hear how great you are—they want help solving their problems as quickly and cost-effectively as possible. And many times, some of the most valuable backlinks to your site will be those that are created voluntarily and spontaneously by others—bloggers, site owners, social media users—based on the quality and usefulness of your content.

Given the near ubiquitous use of the web for researching product and services prior to buying, optimizing all of your potential sources of site traffic gives you the best chance to be found when your prospective customers are looking. And as you continue to analyze your site’s traffic, be aware that website marketing and traffic building are ongoing processes.

It’s critical to regularly examine your data so that you can spot potential problems and fix them before your site’s visibility and traffic is further compromised. On the flip side, your customers will tell you what you’re doing right—you simply have to pay attention to the data and understand that it not only tells you a powerful story about your customers, but also helps you make key decisions.

Are you listening?

 

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