Posts Tagged ‘Frank Strong’

35 Stupendous Social Networking Facts and Stats

Tuesday, August 11th, 2015

Though “social media” broadly encompasses a variety of platforms including blogs (WordPress, Medium, Tumblr), content sharing (YouTube, SlideShare, Instagram), and content curation (Scoop.It, Triberr,, the term is nearly synonymous to many for the big social networks.

And with Google+ being deprecated, social networking now primarily means the “big three” of Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, plus Pinterest now at #4.

Facebook facts and stats 2015

Image credit: The Wonder of Tech

Here are a few highlights from the social networks stats and facts below:

  • • Everyone’s on Facebook–except CEOs? Facebook is of course (by far) the largest social network. It drives more than one-fifth of all social media referral traffic to websites; 30% of the U.S. population gets its daily news there; and 77% of B2C companies have acquired a customer through Facebook. Yet just 8% of Fortune 500 CEOs have a Facebook account–a lower adoption level than American grandparents.
  • • Twitter can’t get no respect. Though 85% of B2B marketers distribute content on Twitter, only half view it as an effective social media channel, and just 42 Fortune 500 CEOs have a Twitter account (and a third of those haven’t posted anything in the last 100 days). Yet 75% of journalists use Twitter to build their personal brands, and Twitter drives more web visits than StumbleUpon,  Reddit, Google+, YouTube, and LinkedIn–combined.
  • • And LinkedIn means business… 40% of B2B buyers say LinkedIn is important when researching technologies and services to purchase; 65% of B2b companies have acquired a customer through LinkedIn; and 91% of B2B marketers distribute content there. The most popular type of content is industry insights.
  • • …while Pinterest means shopping. Pinterest drives 25% of all retail website referral traffic. Consumer brands are noticing: 36% of Fortune 500 companies had a presence in 2014, up from 9% in 2013 and just 2% in 2012.

Find these and many more nuggets of information in these nearly three dozen stupendous social networking facts and stats.

12 Facebook Statistics and Facts

1. Each day on Facebook, there are 350 million photos uploaded; 45 billion “Like” buttons clicked; and 10 billion messages sent. (The Wonder of Tech)

2. Facebook accounts for 21% of all social media referral traffic to websites. (TechCrunch)

3. 81% of B2B marketers use Facebook to distribute content. (Digital Marketing Philippines)

4. Worldwide digital ad spending topped $140 billion in 2014. Facebook accounted for 7.8% of that total. (eMarketer)

5. 8.3% of Fortune 500 CEOs have a Facebook account, putting them firmly behind America’s grandparents in terms of adoption. 2.6% of CEOs have Instagram accounts. (MediaPost)

6. While 55% of SMBs maintain a Facebook Page, just 20% have run a Facebook ad or promoted post. (MediaPost)

7. 77% of B2C companies have acquired customers through Facebook. (Ber|Art)

8. In an average month, 1.28 billion users are active on Facebook. (Convince & Convert)

9. In the United States, average click-through rate (CTR) for Facebook advertising increased by better than 50% last year, from .09% to .14%. But the average Facebook CTR in the U.K. is nearly twice that, at 0.27%. (Convince & Convert)

10. Facebook drives 23% of all website traffic. (Shareaholic)

11. 81% of millennials are on Facebook and their median friend count is 250. (Heidi Cohen)

12. 30% of the U.S. population gets its daily news on Facebook. (BentoBox Media)

8 Twitter Facts and Stats

13. 85% of B2B marketers use Twitter to distribute content. (Digital Marketing Philippines)

14. Or 74% of them do, depending on whose stats you believe.  (Biznology)

Twitter social media marketing

Image credit: Ber|Art

15. And yet – only half of B2B marketers view Twitter as an effective social media channel. (Ber|Art)

16. Twitter offers more referral traffic per share than Facebook. (Social Media Today)

17. 42 Fortune 500 CEOs (8.4%) have a Twitter account, though nearly a third haven’t posted anything in the last 100 days. Those who do post send an average of 0.48 tweets per day. Roughly half tweet once a month or less, and less than a quarter tweet daily. (MediaPost)

18. Twitter drives just over 1% of all website traffic. While that’s considerably less than Facebook or Pinterest, it’s more visits than are driven by StumbleUpon, Reddit, Google+, YouTube, and LinkedIn–combined. (Shareaholic)

19. Twitter is where millennials turn for business and financial information as well as sports. (Heidi Cohen)

20. 75% of journalists say they use Twitter to build their personal brands. (BentoBox Media)

10 LinkedIn Statistics and Facts

21. 91% of B2B marketers use LinkedIn to distribute content. (TopRank)

22. Just 30% of executive directors at the top 100 companies in NASDAQ are active on social networks. LinkedIn led the way, with 23% of executives maintaining a profile on the professional site, followed by Twitter with 11%. (MediaPost)

Why B2B marketers should use LinkedIn

Image credit: Ber|Art

23. Nearly two-thirds (65%) of B2B companies have acquired a customer through LinkedIn. (Ber|Art)

24. 40% of B2B buyers say LinkedIn is important when researching technologies and services to purchase. (Ber|Art)

25. 97% of the Fortune 500 companies have a company profile on LinkedIn. Yeah, I’m thinking the same thing–how is it possible this isn’t 100%? (Sword and the Script)

26. 98% of sales reps with 5000+ LinkedIn connections achieve quota. (Biznology)

27. You are almost 5X more likely to schedule a first meeting if you have a personal LinkedIn connection. (Biznology)

28. Twitter and Facebook may reign when it comes to social sharing of stories, blog posts, and visual media, but when it comes to direct traffic to your main site, LinkedIn is far and away the No. 1 social referral source. LinkedIn accounts for 64% of social media-driven visits to corporate home pages, vs. 17% from Facebook and 14% from Twitter. (Buffer)

29. The three most popular types of content on LinkedIn are industry insights (favored by 60% of users), followed by company news (53% – likely popular with job seekers) and new products/services (43%). (Buffer)

30. To optimize reach, post at least 20 times per month on LinkedIn. But keep in mind that “LinkedIn’s best-in-class marketers post 3-4 updates per day, which could mean up to 80 posts per month” (though only if your content supports this). (Buffer)

5 Pinterest Facts and Stats

31. Women account for 69% of all users but 92% of all pins on Pinterest. (Ber|Art)

32. Pinterest accounts for 25% of all retail website referral traffic. (Ber|Art)

33. 36% of Fortune 500 companies had a presence on Pinterest in 2014, up dramatically from 9% in 2013 and just 2% in 2012. (Sword and the Script)

34. According to data from Shareaholic, Pinterest drives nearly 6% of all website traffic–5X as much as Twitter (does that sound right?). (Shareaholic)

35. Pinterest is where millennials shop. (Heidi Cohen)

This was the eighth and penultimate post of Marketing Stats Summer (#statssummer) on Webbiquity.

#1: Welcome to Marketing Stats Summer!

#2: 34 Compelling Content Marketing Stats and Facts

#3: 21 Spectacular SEO and Search Marketing Stats and Facts

#4: Five Intriguing Inbound Marketing Stats [Infographic]

#5: 31 Sensational Social Media Marketing and PR Stats and Facts

#6: 17 Excellent Email and Mobile Marketing Stats and Facts

#7: 14 Dazzling Digital Marketing Stats and Facts

#8: 35 Stupendous Social Networking Facts and Stats

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31 Sensational Social Media Marketing and PR Stats and Facts

Tuesday, July 14th, 2015

Business and consumer marketers are nearly unanimous in their belief in the importance of social media to marketing activities. As noted below, the money is following that belief: social media now accounts for about 11% of all digital marketing outlays, and spending on social media marketing will total nearly $10 billion this year.

Still, marketers sometimes struggle with strategy, tactics, and measurement in social media marketing. Here are five actionable takeaways from the two-and-a-half dozen noteworthy social media marketing and PR statistics and facts presented below:

Social media customer service growth

Image credit: i-SCOOP

Be responsive. People expect to hear back from the brands they interact with on Twitter and other social networks. And when they report a problem or issue, they expect to hear back quickly: 53% of consumers on Twitter expect a response within the hour. Furthermore, nearly half of all social media users share content with their friends, family and co-workers at least weekly; so if they have a bad experience with your brand, the word is likely to spread.

Strategize and measure. 88% of marketers believe social media marketing is important, and 75% of consumers say they use social media in the buying process. Yet nearly half of marketers only “somewhat agree” that analyzing social media engagement can help improve the bottom line. The key to making social media marketing effective at the business level is to have a strategy in place and measure key performance indicators. Unfortunately, strategy and measurement are cited as the top two challenges faced by social media marketers. They aren’t easy, but those who get these two areas right will succeed.

Know your market (B2B). Twitter is the place to engage with companies: While just 20 of the of Fortune 500 companies actually engage with their customers on Facebook, 83% have a presence on Twitter—as do 76% of the NASDAQ 100, 100% of Dow Jones companies, and 92% of the S&P 500. For reaching top executives though, LinkedIn is the place to be. Though only 32% of Fortune 500 CEOs have a presence on any major social network, the majority of those (25% of the total) are on LinkedIn. And 59% of executives prefer video content to text.

Know your market (B2C): Nearly three-quarters of adult Internet users in the U.S. are active on at least one social network (predominantly Facebook)—but not all use social media the same way or have the same expectations. For example, while just 2% of all consumers prefer social media over other channels for customer service, 27% of Gen Y-ers favor it. On the other hand, consumers aged 55-64 are more than twice as likely to engage with brand content as those younger than 28. Older social media users favor Facebook and Pinterest; the 34-and-under crowd dominates on Tumblr and Instagram.

Get social PR right. While journalists are open to connecting with and being contacted by PR pros using social media, they prefer email for pitches and follow up. But 76% of journalists say they feel pressure to think about their story’s potential for sharing on social media platforms—so make sure that’s part of the pitch.

There’s much more in this collection of two and half dozen sensational social media marketing and social PR facts and statistics.

16 Social Media Marketing Stats

1. People ages 55-64 are more than twice as likely to engage with a brands’ content than those 28 or younger. (Social Media Today)

2. People share content 49% more on weekdays than on weekends. (Social Media Today)

3. On average, social media accounts for 11% of digital marketing spending. (MarketingProfs)

4. 72% of adult internet users in the U.S. are now active on at least one social network, up from 67% in 2012. (Marissa’s Picks)

5. More than 70% of users expect to hear back from the brand they’re interacting with on Twitter, and 53% want a response within the hour. (Marissa’s Picks)

6. 49% of people say they share online content they like with friends, family or co-workers at least weekly. (Ber|Art)

Twitter social media marketing

Image credit: Ber|Art

7. 86% of marketers believe that social media is important for their business. (Ber|Art)

8. U.S. spending on social media marketing will reach $9.7 billion in 2015.  (MediaPost)

9. Although 88% of marketers believe social media marketing is important, nearly half (48%) only “somewhat agree” that analyzing social media engagement can help improve the bottom line, and 15% don’t think analyzing social engagement matters at all. (eMarketer)

10. The top four challenges faced by social media marketers worldwide are assessing the effectiveness of social media activities (cited by 67% of marketers); designing an overall social media strategy (62%); making social media data actionable (61%); and educating staff on how to use social media (59%). (eMarketer)

11. Product/brand recommendations on social media mean more to younger people. 28% of those aged 18-34 say they are “very” or “fairly” likely to make a purchase based on a friend’s social media post, while just 33% say they are “not at all likely” to do so. The first figure gets smaller and the second larger with age; among those 65 and over, just 4% are likely to make a purchase based on a social media recommendation, while 78% are not at all likely. (Heidi Cohen)

12. 75% of customers say they use social media as part of the buying process. (Biznology)

13. 56% of marketers do not use any form of paid promotions on social media. (Cision)

14. Consumers may use social media for customer service, but they don’t love it. Although 67% of consumers have already used a company’s social media channel for customer service, just 2% say they prefer it over other options. Phone and email remain the most popular channels (66% combined). (MediaPost)

15. However–27% of Gen Y-ers favor social media for customer service. (MediaPost)

social network user demographics 2015

Image credit: Social Media Today

16. Facebook and Pinterest are among the “oldest” social networks in terms of their member demographics; 63% of U.S. Facebook users and 58% of those on Pinterest are age 35 and older. On the other hand, the 34-and-under crowd dominate on Tumblr (just over 50%) and Instagram (60%). Twitter is more balanced. (Social Media Today)

6 Social PR Statistics and Facts

17. While many journalists say they’d like PR pros to contact them via social media, less than half of PR practitioners have successfully pitched a journalist or outlet via social. So while engaging on social is a great add-on, traditional methods such as using a media database to target specific beats remains ever-important. (Cision)

18. The top three measures used by PR pros to show social media success increased website traffic (64%), increased engagement (61%) and increased followers (59%). (Cision)

19. 88% of PR professionals say their businesses or clients regularly engage on Facebook—more than any other social media platform. Twitter came in a close second at 85%. (Cision)

Social media is the #1 activity on the web

Image credit: B2B PR Sense Blog

20. Journalists receive, on average, 50-100 press releases every week. 44% prefer to receive them in the morning. 68% just want the facts. (B2B PR Sense Blog)

21. 76% of journalists say they feel pressure to think about their story’s potential for sharing on social media platforms. 64% say they prefer that follow-up on “pitches” be done via email rather than phone. (BentoBox Media)

22. When using video, 74% of journalists prefer content created by their own organizations. Just 3% use corporate / branded videos. (BentoBox Media)

6 Facts and Stats About Executive and Enterprise Social Media Use

23. Just 32% of Fortune 500 CEOs have a presence on any of the major social networks (Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, and Instagram). Most of those have a presence on only one platform, with the majority (25.4% of the total) on LinkedIn. Mark Zuckerberg is the only Fortune 500 CEO on all five major social networks — and he owns two of them. (MediaPost)

24. 59% of senior executives prefer video over text. (41 Stories)

25. Just 20 of the Fortune 100 comnpanies actually engage with their customers on Facebook. (i-SCOOP) [IMAGE maybe – good one – social customer service]

26. On a company level, 83% of the Fortune 500 had a Twitter presence in 2014, up from 77% the year before. 80% were on Facebook, up from 70%. (Sword and the Script)

27. Among 500 of the largest U.S. companies, Cisco and HP score first and second in their use of social media for corporate communications. But Facebook is only number 242, and Apple comes in 416th place. According to research by Investis, “Facebook was marked down because it did not engage with its corporate audience using the other social media platforms reviewed. Even on its own platform, Facebook’s investor relations page fell well short of best practice. For example, it does not use videos or hashtags and it does not appear to have responded to any of the posts left by users.” (Virtual Press Office)

28. Only 76% of Nasdaq 100 companies maintain a corporate Twitter account which compares with 100% of the Dow Jones and 92% of the S&P 100. (Virtual Press Office)

3 SMB Social Media Marketing Stats

29. 75% of SMBs use social media to promote their businesses–more than any other media category. (MediaPost)

30. Social media is not only number one in terms of utilization by SMBs, it is also number one in share of SMB media spending (21% of total media budgets). (MediaPost)

31. In the average firm of 100-500 employees, seven people are involved in a buying decision. (Biznology)

This was post #5 of Marketing Stats Summer (#statssummer) on Webbiquity.

#1: Welcome to Marketing Stats Summer!

#2: 34 Compelling Content Marketing Stats and Facts

#3: 21 Spectacular SEO and Search Marketing Stats and Facts

#4: Five Intriguing Inbound Marketing Stats [Infographic]

#5: 31 Sensational Social Media Marketing and PR Stats and Facts

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34 Compelling Content Marketing Stats and Facts

Tuesday, June 16th, 2015

Content marketing is now ubiquitous, with 93% of all marketers saying they do content marketing (it’s not clear what the other 7% are doing). But with so much content being produced, distributed and shared, how do you make your efforts stand out and grab the attention of your prospects?

2015 compelling content marketing stats and factsBased on the research detailed below, here are five key takeaways:

  • • Tell, don’t sell. Sales are a top goal of content marketing—but website traffic is the most common metric used to measure success. Only about half of marketers try to connect content to sales. Why? Because with the exception of direct response (a small part of content marketing), content supports sales rather than driving them directly. And trying to use content too blatantly to drive sales often backfires.
  • • Blog. Blogs are one of the most effective tools for increasing organic search traffic, and are highly influential with buyers. Yet just 31% of Fortune 500 enterprises now maintain an official blog.
  • • Make email a key component. While most content sharing efforts by marketers are focused on the “big four” social networks, most (72%) content sharing done by buyers is on “dark social”–primarily email and apps.
  • And use video. Half of buyers say they are more likely to seek out more information about a product and more confident in making an online purchase after viewing related video. It’s also “sticky” (users spend, on average, 88% more time on sites with video) and attracts more inbound links than text-only content.
  • • But get out and meet people, too. In-person events are still the most effective channel for B2B marketers.

Want to know more? Check out these 34 compelling content marketing statistics and facts from a variety of expert sources.

22 Content Marketing Facts and Statistics

1. 93% of B2B marketers are using content marketing. (TopRank)

2. 42% of B2B marketers viewed themselves as successful with their content marketing efforts in 2014 – up from 36% in 2013. (TopRank)

3. The most effective content marketing tactics according to B2B marketers are:

– In-person events (70%)
– Case studies (65%)
– Videos (63%)
– Webinars (63%)
– Blogs (62%)
– eNewsletters (60%)
– White papers and research reports (59%)


4. More than 70% of B2B marketers use the “big four” social media sites (LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube) to distribute content. Just 55% use Google+. And only 34% use Pinterest, 22% Instagram, 22% Vimeo, 15% StumbleUpon, and 14% Tumblr. (Digital Marketing Philippines)

5. However – only 28% of content sharing happens through the big social networks. The other 72% is shared through “Dark Social,” the private sharing that happens behind closed private communications such as emails, chats, and mobile apps. (Social Media Today)

6. Brands that use shortened URLs with a “vanity domain” experience an average increased click volume of 25% compared to long URLs or generic URL shorteners. (Social Media Today)

7. Content shared on Thursdays has the longest “link lifespan” (people still clicking on those links several days later). (Social Media Today)

8. 41% of marketers say driving sales is the No. 1 goal for their content marketing strategies; 94% put sales in their top five content marketing goals. Brand awareness was the second-most-popular goal with 88% adding it to their top five, while 21% ranked lead generation as their No. 1 goal. (MediaPost)

9. The most-trusted types of online promotional content include peer reviews, natural search results, and brand Web sites, while display advertising and push text messages are the least trusted. (MediaPost)

10. The top metrics used to measure content marketing success are website traffic (cited by 71% of marketers), revenue (57%), keyword traffic and conversions (46%), and search engine rankings (46%). (MediaPost)

11. The top content marketing goals for B2C companies are customer retention/loyalty (88%), engagement (88%), brand awareness (87%) and sales (77%). (Heidi Cohen)

12. The top metrics used by B2C marketers to measure content marketing success are website traffic (62%), sales (54%), higher conversion rates (39%), and SEO ranking (39%). (Heidi Cohen)

13. Companies spend, on average, 25% of total marketing budgets on content marketing. (Heidi Cohen)

14. The most effective B2B content marketing tactics are in-person events (cited by 69% of marketers), webinars/webcasts (64%), video (60%), and blogs (60%). (eMarketer)

15. 57% of purchase decisions are made before a customer ever talks to a supplier, and Gartner predicts that by 2020, customers will manage 85% of their relationship with an enterprise without interacting with a human. (Target Marketing)

16. The top three reasons consumers share content online are to entertain (44%); to educate (25%); and to reflect their identity (families, friendships, values, etc. – 20%). (MarketingProfs)

17. Though men share more content on average, women expect more engagement: 69% of women expect five or more comments, likes, or shares on their posts. (MarketingProfs)

18. B2B marketing is often misfocused. While B2B marketers tend to emphasize corporate social responsibility, sustainability, global reach, and shaping the direction of the market, buyers care most about open honest dialog with customers, responsibility across the suppy chain, and market leadership. The only major area of overlap is in “high level of specialist expertise.” Neither group places much priority on having the lowest price. (Barraclough & Co)

19. The most useful forms of content when making online B2B purchases are technical brochures / specification sheets (cited by 61% of buyers), followed by instruction manuals / how-to documents (46%), videos (38%) and case studies (31%). Less than a third said webinars, while a quarter value inforgraphics and social media activity. (V3B Blog)

20. 85% of corporate marketers are using buyer personas for content marketing and messaging. But only 15% say their buyer personas are very to significantly effective. (Tony Zambito)

21. And 60% of corporate marketers say they have no to very little understanding of what the best practices are for buyer persona development. (Tony Zambito)

22. 54% of corporate marketers say that quality content is among the most effective SEO tactics their company uses, while 50% also cite (closely related) frequent website updates. (MediaPost)

5 Business Blogging Statistics and Facts

23. Trailing only retail and brand sites, blogs rank as the third most influential digital resource guiding consumer purchasing decisions. (Marketing Magazine)

24. A whopping 93% of bloggers say they either “don’t mind” or enjoy being approached by brands. (Marketing Magazine)

25. 55% of bloggers say the question of whether or not to expect payment from a brand in return for blogging was dependent on the agency, brand or the blogging activity in question. 26% said that they would always expect monetary compensation in return for blogging. This varies widely by blog subject matter, however; over 90% of bloggers in fashion, lifestyle and beauty now expect to receive payment or compensation in return for blogging. (Marketing Magazine)

26. Just 31% of Fortune 500 enterprises now maintain an official blog, down from 34% in 2013. (Sword and the Script)

27. 28% of corporate marketers cite the difficulty of frequent blogging as a top SEO challenge. (MediaPost)

7 Video and Image Marketing Facts and Statistics

28. There are 100 hours of video uploaded to YouTube every minute. (The Wonder of Tech)

29. The number of photos shared online increased 50% in 2014, primarily on Snapchat and WhatsApp. (TechCrunch)

30. Marketers looking to drive more traffic to their Web content without an overhaul of programs should rethink visual images; video and images drive 13% more traffic than traditional content. (MediaPost)

31. Nearly half (46%) of people say they’d be more likely to seek out information about a product or service after seeing it in an online video. (41 Stories)

32. Video is “sticky.” The average user spends 88% more time on a website with video. (41 Stories)

33. Blog posts incorporating video attract three times as many inbound links as blog posts without video. (41 Stories)

34. 52% of consumers say watching product videos makes them more confident in online purchase decisions. (Ber|Art)

This was post #2 of Marketing Stats Summer (#statssummer) on Webbiquity.

#1: Welcome to Marketing Stats Summer!

#2: 34 Compelling Content Marketing Stats and Facts

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Welcome to Marketing Stats Summer!

Monday, June 15th, 2015

75% of customers say they use social media as part of the buying process1, and 88% of marketing professionals believe social media is important to their companies2. Yet social media accounts for just 11% of digital marketing budgets3, on average, and 56% of marketers don’t do any paid promotion on social media4.

Marketing stats expertsCan’t get enough of stats like those? Then you’ll love the next seven sizzling summer weeks (except for the week after Independence Day in the U.S., when no one’s really paying attention), starting tomorrow, of posts containing dozens of fascinating stats and facts about digital marketing, social networks, SEO, email / mobile, content marketing and more.

Along the lines of this spring’s blogging for business series here, this series will share findings and insights from some of the top minds and voices in digital and web marketing, including Heidi Cohen, Michael Brenner, Marissa Pick, Frank Strong, Shelly Kramer, and Lee Odden.

The reporting and revelations kick off tomorrow with 34 Compelling Content Marketing Stats and Facts.


1. 37 facts on the future of Social Selling vs. Cold Calling, Biznology

2. Are Social Media Marketers Losing Confidence?, eMarketer

3. State of Search Results: Budgeting Trends [Infographic], MarketingProfs

4. The State of Social Media for PR Pros, Cision


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How to be Twitterific – 39 Expert Twitter Guides and Tips

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2015

From humble beginnings, Twitter has grown to become an indispensable source for online news alerts as well as a vital marketing tool. The microblogging site now boasts more than 255 million monthly active users, and 53% of Twitter users recommend products in their tweets at some time.

Twitter priority matrix

Image credit: Buffer

As its popularity and user base grows, techniques for getting the most out of Twitter, third-party tools that add special-purpose value, and the platform itself continue to evolve.

Given the increasing level of social media noise, which advanced practices are most helpful for Twitter marketers today? How can brands and individuals make their tweets stand out? What are the most effective techniques and tools for increasing engagement and growing one’s Twitter following? How can marketers best utilize Twitter’s expanded features and the latest tools?

Find the answers to those questions and others here in more than three dozen expert Twitter marketing guides from top social media pros.

Expert Twitter Marketing Tips and Tactics

Social PR Tweets: 8 Ways to Use Visuals in Twitter Chats and More by Social PR Chat

Lisa BuyerThe simply awesome Lisa Buyer demonstrates eight ways to boost the visibility of your tweets, from pinning “your Tweet to the top of your profile before your event or to highlight your news for the week” and changing your logo or profile image to highlight a holiday or cause to using “Canva to create a variety of visuals to promote your most recent blog post and rotate them out using a platform like Buffer. Same story, different visual.”

25 Effective Ways to Use Twitter Search for Marketing, Sales and Support by the Zapier Blog

Danny SchreiberDanny Schreiber provides instruction on “some of the best ways you can put Twitter search to use for your business, along with some tools that’ll help you learn more from Tweets, identify trends, (and) see how your Tweets are impacting your business,” among them: using Twitter advanced search to monitor brand mentions; monitoring sentiment about a competitor (“only search for those Tweets with one condition: individuals unhappy with the company”); and building a Twitter list of potential customers.

A to Z of Bite-Size Twitter Tips For Business Startups by Social Success
***** 5 STARS

Ruby RusineRuby Rusine serves up a creative and useful list of Twitter tips, literally from A to Z, beginning with tips for automating posts, being consistent, and clear expectation-setting and progressing through the letter Z: “Zero in on  strategies that will help you attain your marketing goal/s. It is one thing to engage; but it is another to get people do what you want them to do.”

6 Ways to Get Your Tweets Noticed by Social Media Examiner

Aaron LeeAsking “Do people pay attention to your tweets?,” frequent best-of honoree Aaron Lee offers six techniques to increase the impact of your tweets, from setting “yourself apart by adding your own opinion, question or other commentary to” your retweets in order to give your followers context, to simply talking to people (“While everyone else is busy shouting his or her own message, you’ll be the one listening so you can make a better connection”).

Why Should You Use Twitter: Confessions of a Dedicated Tweeter by SumAll

Jacob PastrovichJacob Pastrovich reveals the three major ways he uses Twitter to engage with audiences, along with tips and ideas for each, for example: “I schedule posts to go out over the next week or so, usually around five tweets for each piece of original content. You can…do this using tools like HootSuite, Buffer, TweetDeck, or something else…The reason I schedule tweets with the same link is to make sure each post reaches multiple time zones and as much of our audience as possible, because some people might check their feed at 8am, others at 6pm, and we just want to make sure that each post has the chance to get in front of all of our followers’ eyeballs. Just make sure your tweets don’t all have the same copy. Make it fun, and switch it up as much as possible.”

The Twitter Strategy Guide: 14 Twitter Tips to Take Your Tweeting to the Next Level by Buffer Social

Kevan LeeKevan Lee briefly lists a half-dozen tips helpful to Twitter users of any experience level, then goes deeper into a larger set of recommendations for advanced Twitter users, starting with understanding how Twitter fits into your priorities and customizing the email notifications you get from Twitter and progressing through cleaning up the list of those you follow, using tools like ManageFlitter.

Advanced Twitter Marketing Techniques by Flying Man Productions

Here are sixteen tips for Twitter marketing success, such as following competitors, using the list function to “target different groups with a specific message or angle,” and finding the best times to tweet based on when your followers are online: “Use tools (like Tweriod) to determine the best times of day to tweet.”

Infographic: Dr. Seuss’ Guide to Twitter for Busy Executives by The Sword and the Script

Frank StrongFrank Strong presents a whimsical yet useful infographic guide to Twitter in Dr. Seuss style rhyme and illustrations, produced by HootSuite. Among the five tips for growing one’s Twitter following and influence: “First, let Tweets breathe. Give your message some time. Clogging up feeds has no reason or rhyme. If you send Tweets too much, you’ll risk looking like spam. But not the good kind you fry, with green eggs and ham.”

5 Twitter marketing tactics that generate the most engagement by Brafton

Lauren KayeLauren Kaye shares a handful of helpful Twitter engagement tips in this short but smart post, among them engaging like eBay (“As the company with the highest engagement score, eBay’s Twitter feed should be the glowing example for social strategies. And a first glance at the brand’s content reveals the key to eBay’s success is giving followers what they’d expect”) and catching eyes with visuals like Nokia (“posts containing pictures and links receive 150 percent more engagement than average posts”).

Focus on Twitter: What Comes After Setup? by Digital Marketing Musings

Sue BradyThe delightful Sue Brady takes a deep “dive into using Twitter and increasing your presence there.” Though aimed primarily at those relatively new to Twitter, it’s worth perusing even for experience Twitterers. She walks through choosing your subject matter, using hashtags, finding industry experts, and growing a following (for example, by attending relevant tweet chats).

How to Increase Twitter Engagement by 324% by DR4WARD

Dr. William J. WardDr. William J. Ward showcases an infographic illustrating some basic facts about Twitter (e.g., a third of all Twitter users follow at least one brand, and 67% of them are more likely to buy from brands they follow), when to tweet, what to tweet (“engagement is 200% for tweets with image links”), and “unsaid Tweeting rules.”

How to Build a Twitter Following

Get More Followers and Increase Engagement With These 7 Counterintuitive Twitter Tips by Buffer Social

Roy PovarchikRoy Povarchik shares “advanced tips and tricks to more followers and increased engagement on Twitter,” such as using tools like Tweepi to “get tons of followers but also make sure you have a qualified and engaged following,” following back only accounts that interest you, and—to keep your timeline clean—setting up the “five lists every marketer should create.”

Get More Followers On Twitter With These 12 Tips by Social Media Rush

Reginald ChanReginald Chan shares a dozen practical and actionable tips for growing your Twitter following, from using a smiling face in your profile (“A smiling face picture can increase followers rate by over 10%”) and creating a custom “About Me” page as your primary account link through focusing more on quality than quantity in your Tweets and practicing “strategic following” (as he demonstrates in an eight-minute video here).

How to Get More Twitter Followers by leaderswest Digital Marketing Journal

Jim DoughertyJim Dougherty promises and delivers not just “another article about how to get more Twitter followers…(but) pragmatism. No touchy-feely gobbly-gook – just some straightforward tools (bookended with some cynicism) to help you grow your Twitter followers.” He walks through how to use tools like justunfollow, manageflitter, and socialbro (as well as Twitter advertising) to help quickly build a targeted Twitter following ( with some work).

How to Build a HUGE, Targeted Twitter Following In 20 Minutes a Day by Boom Social

Kim GarstKim Garst presents “20 quick and easy steps to help you build a huge, targeted Twitter following” in less than a half-hour per day, from scheduling some of your tweets to maintain an active flow when you can’t be at your computer and using Twitter directories like Wefollow and Twellow to recommending others and using Twitter search to find and follow “people who are talking about your brand, your products, or about something around your niche.”

Expert Guides to Twitter Stats and Analytics

Twitter Experiencing Massive Growth: New Research by Social Media Examiner

Suzanne DelzioSuzanne Delzio passes along results from four recent research studies indicating a bright future for Twitter. Among the findings: according to Pew Research, “from 2013 to 2014, Twitter’s audience rose by 27.7% (from 18% to 23% of all Internet users),” and “in a 2014 study by eMarketer, researchers estimate Twitter will grow by 5% to 10% year over year until 2018 when 24.2% of Internet users will be on the platform.”

15 Simple-to-Find Stats to Help You Tweet Better: How to Use Twitter Analytics by Buffer Social

Kevan Lee (again) presents his list of the “15 most useful Twitter stats used by the pros…as well as how you can find these stats for your Twitter profile.” His list ranges from how to discover the top interests of your followers and who your followers are following to level of engagement (retweets and favorites) and tweet reach percentage (how many of your followers you actually reach).

How Do You Know if Your Twitter Strategy is Effective? by Razor Social

Ian ClearyIan Cleary outlines four questions to ask to help determine if (and how well) your Twitter marketing strategy is working, and how to gather the supporting metrics to answer each one. For example: to answer the question “Is Twitter driving relevant traffic back to your website?”, he shows how to use Google Analytics custom segments and goals to analyze the engagement and conversions of Twitter-driven site traffic and compare it to other sources.

How to Use Twitter Analytics to Find Important Data by Social Media Examiner

Alex BossengerAlex Bossenger shows how to use Twitter analytics to “find the data you need to track your campaign success” in this richly illustrated post. He explains the importance of and how to use the Twitter dashboard, followers dashboard, how to manage user profiles, and even how to switch between managed accounts if you use your Twitter handle to manage multiple Twitter accounts.

15 Twitter Statistics You Probably Don’t Know, But Should [Infographic] by Social Marketing Writing

Mitt RayMitt Ray shares an infographic featuring 15 Twitter stats to help you “get better results on Twitter…(including) statistics that can be used to get more retweets, clicks on the links you share and followers.” Among the stats: tweets with open and close quotes are 30% more likely to be retweeted than those without (who knew?); tweets including numbers get 17% more retweets; and tweets that contain links shortended using are about 9% more likely to be retweeted.

Guides to Using Twitter Features

15 Twitter Hacks That Will Turn You into a Twitter Ninja by Buffer Social

Neil PatelNeil Patel offers instructions for 15 Twitter “hacks” to become a power user, from creating follow lists and discovering which lists you are on (“From your lists page, click on ‘Member of.’ Knowing what lists you’re on gives you an idea of how you’re perceived on Twitter”) to managing the apps that have access to your Twitter account and a full list of Twitter keyboard shortcuts.

5 Twitter hacks that will blow your mind by iMedia Connection

Greg KihlstromThough much of what’s covered here (using Twitter advanced search operators, keyboard shortcuts, timing tweets) is detailed in other posts in this collection, Greg Kihlstrom adds his own unique spin, and includes one “hack’ not explained elsewhere: “If you’re ready to move to the next level, get ready to use Twitter to perform real-world tasks. Whether you want it to make a pot of coffee or operate a remote dog feeder, working with Twitter’s API opens up a whole new world of possibilities.”

5 Tips for Brands to Get the Most Out of Twitter’s Latest Update by Social Media Today

Mike LewisThough these features are no longer “new,” the detail provided here by Mike Lewis is helpful. He details the “what” and “how to” of Twitter capabilities like “best tweets,” “pinned tweets” (“the ability to ‘Pin’ or feature one of your tweets at the top of your profile stream so visitors to your profile see it immediately”), filtered tweets, and the new look of follower / following lists.

How to Schedule Photo Tweets That Expand in the Twitter Feed by Search Engine Watch

Travis BernardPointing out that “Although photo tweets do a great job captivating our audiences, it can be a challenge for social media marketers to schedule visual content ahead of time. Platforms like Hootsuite let you schedule photo tweets, but they don’t appear expanded in the feed like a direct upload would,” Travis Bernard explains, step by step, how to “schedule a photo tweet from the native Twitter client.”

Twitter News and the Setting You May Want to Change Right Now by The Wonder of Tech

Carolyn Nicander MohrCarolyn Nicander Mohr explains how Twitter’s photo tagging capability works, noting that you no longer “have to waste any of your precious 140 characters with @TwitterID’s. Instead you can tag someone in the photo and free up space for more words, hashtags and links.” She also explains how this potentially impacts privacy, and how to change your settings if you’d rather not be tagged in just any photo on Twitter.

How to Use Twitter Lists to Follow Thousands (and Appear Superhuman) by Post Planner

Aaron Lee (again) talks about “10 brilliant ways to use Twitter Lists to always be engaging,” from the basics of creating lists and who you should add to them (influencers, retweeters, co-workers, etc.) to how to follow tweets based on conversations and interests using Flipboard.

Five Ways To Use Twitter’s Favorite Button by SocialTimes

Lauren DuganWhile acknowledging that “The favorite button is not Twitter’s most popular feature, and it doesn’t get as much press as retweeting,” Lauren Dugan nevertheless makes her case for its growing popularity, explaining a handful of different uses for favorites, such as to save links, pay it forward, or to network (“Using favorites, you can mark the tweets from the people you want to network with, and make sure you follow up with them about their tweet shortly”).

The 20 different ways of using the Twitter favourite button by Econsultancy

Chris LakeGoing beyond Lauren’s post above, Chris Lake explores 20 ways of using the “favorites” button, including liking something (obviously), disliking a tweet (using the favorites button sarcastically), to bookmark a tweet, to trigger some further action using IFTTT, to attract more followers, build a personal brand, and other purposes that may never have occurred to you.

Best Guides to Twitter Tools

5 Tools for Downloading and Analyzing Twitter Data by Entepreneur

Ann SmartyGuru-ess of online tools and frequent best-of honoree Ann Smarty reports on five data mining tools “you can take advantage of to archive your own Twitter data,” among them BirdSong Analytics (“an absolutely unique tool that lets you download all the followers of any Twitter accounts. It’s a paid tool but I don’t think such feature has any alternatives”) and NodeXL (which enables you to take “archived data from Twitter, input it into NodeXL, and create a breathtaking visual representation of your tweets from any period you like”).

How to Find the Best Twitter Hashtags by Sprout Social

Michael PattersonMichael Patterson showcases nine helpful tools for finding hashtags that are relevant to your brand, including, #tagdef (“essentially a combined dictionary/thesaurus for trending hashtags”), and Tagboard (“one of the most aesthetically pleasing of all of the hashtag research sites. For each ‘Tagboard’ you create, you specify a specific hashtag for it to track. Tagboard then displays popular posts containing that hashtag on a board”) and others.

Easily Manage Twitter #Hashtag Contest with Zapier by Brad S. Knutson

Brad KnutsonBrad Knutson offers a detailed, six-step guide to creating a Twitter content using Zapier, from getting set up and modifying your settings through connecting your Twitter and Google Docs accounts, selecting your content hashtag, and testing the “zap” (“After I created this Zap, I essentially just let the contest go in the background, and after it was all said and done, I used the spreadsheet to randomly select the winner. It took me longer to set up the Zap than it did to actually monitor and maintain the contest”).

10 Awesome Twitter Analytics and Visualization Tools by Twitter Tools & Tips Blog

Garin KilpatrickGarin Kilpatrick reviews 10 tools “designed to add value by presenting a different way to visualize or analyze your tweets, the people in your network, and the tweets from the people in your network,” including Tweet Archivist, Twitonomy, Twitter Counter (“a way to visualize and track the growth of your own followers, and even compare your growth to the growth of other users”), and Tweetstats.

5 Tools to Simplify Twitter by Social Media Today

Eva GantzEva Gantz writes about her handful of “absolute favorite Twitter tools to save you time and energy, and let you get back to running your business,” including UnTweeps (“UnTweeps lets you improve your following-to-followers ratio (i.e., I’m following 1500 people, and 2000 people are following me) with minimal effort. It simply auto-unfollows any account that hasn’t tweeted in x amount of days”) and Twubs for tracking hashtags.

5 Twitter Tools to Increase Your Blog Retweets by Social Media Examiner

Aaron Lee (once more) helps readers of this post “discover five easy-to-use Twitter tools that make it simple and fast for readers to spread the word about your newest blog content.” Four of the five are WordPress plugins; the other is, a website that lets you “install a prepopulated tweet and use your own call to action in your blog post…you can use it on blogging platforms besides WordPress, in PDFs and in your newsletters.”

5 Tools to Research the Demographics of Your Twitter Followers by Small Business Trends

Ann Smarty (again) highlights five “great apps that will let you get the proper stats to start engaging your followers in a real and dynamic way,” among them BirdSong Analytics: “Do a quick analytics search of any social media profile and find out exactly what conversations your brand is generating. That includes through followers, who you can target more efficiently while still improving your visibility for reaching out to new demographics.”

5 Free and Awesome Tools To Use #Hashtags Wisely by Search Engine Journal

Ann Smarty (once more) writes, “hashtags are everywhere…you can use them for any number of things, but you always want to do so smartly. These tools will help you out,” such as TwChat, a tool for managing tweetchats “which turns a collection of hashtags into a chatroom.” Furthermore, she notes, TwChat is “very simple, free, and no downloads are required.”

44 Twitter Tools That Will Cover All Your Marketing Needs by BloggerJet

Ericson-Ay-MiresEricson Ay Mires serves up brief reviews of nearly four dozen tools for tweet scheduling, social media management / monitoring, content sharing, follower management, Twitter profile design, Twitter research, WordPress plugins, creating “rich tweets,” and bonus Twitter tools such “Group Tweet – Group tweet enables you and several other people to tweet from the same twitter account while maintaining your individual user name. If you run a business that requires lots of people to tweet, don’t miss this one.”

What Twitter Tools Do Social Media Managers Use? By More in Media

Dorien Morin-van DamDorien Morin-van Dam lists more than two dozen of her favorite Twitter productivity tools in nine categories, including brand monitoring (Hootsuite, SproutSocial, Socialmention); tweet scheduling (BufferApp, Social Oomph); finding great content (Triberr, Feedly,; and audience-building (Nearbytweets,

And Finally…Twitter Skepticism

The Unbearable Lightness of Tweeting by The Atlantic

Derek ThompsonJournalist Derek Thompson details his experiment in using Twitter Analytics to determine the value of his tweets in driving web traffic to the publication that employs him. His conclusion? “In the last month, I’ve created nearly 2 million impressions for Twitter. Whether that is good for my Twitter persona and my pride is a qualitative question whose answer resides outside the bounds of an analytics dashboard. But it is quantitatively…” (see the article for the actual metrics).

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